Continuing Budget Stalemate In Olympia Leads To Second Overtime Session

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Tuesday ordered a second 30-day overtime session of the state legislature . It began immediately after the adjournment of the first special session.

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Bring the whole family to the next KPBX Kids’ Concert for high-energy bluegrass music from the Panhandle Polecats. The free, all-ages concert begins at 1 p.m. on June 3, 2017 at the Salvation Army Kroc Center in Couer d’Alene, ID.

The Panhandle Polecats are a quintet of five siblings – two brothers and three sisters – who are known for first-rate music and enthusiastic performances.

“The Panhandle Polecats have gone from being a cute family band to becoming the top dogs and cats in the Inland Northwest Bluegrass scene,” says Kevin Brown, host of Front Porch Bluegrass (heard on KPBX Sundays at 1 p.m.)

From Rathdrum, Idaho, the Panhandle Polecats consist of Austin Little, (banjo), Jenny Little, (bass), Hank Little (dobro & harmonica), Molly Wilbur (mandolin) and Bonnie Campbell(guitar). The band’s music is inspired by bluegrass legends such as Flatt & Scruggs, Bill Monroe and The Dillards.

Some construction is taking place at the Salvation Army Kroc Center, as they add 2000 square feet of mixed use classroom space. They ask that people enter through the Main Entrance.

KPBX Kids' Concerts are free thanks in part to event donors Harvard Park Children's Learning Center North, Numerica Credit Union, Rocket Bakeries, and Pizza Pipeline.

By night, they play gigs. By day, they sample ramen in cities across America.

Montana voters are at the polls as the aftermath of an altercation between the Republican congressional candidate and a reporter unfolds.

Most anyone who has encountered a flamingo has probably been impressed by its signature ability to balance on a single long, spindly leg for remarkably long periods of time.

But actually, scientists have now shown that what appears to be a feat requires almost no muscle activity from the bird.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When it comes to poor Americans, the Trump administration has a message: Government aid is holding many of them back. Without it, many more of them would be working.

Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney said as much when presenting the administration's budget plan this week to cut safety net programs by hundreds of billions of dollars over the next 10 years. The administration also wants to tighten work requirements for those getting aid, such as food stamps, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits.

May 25 is Red Nose Day in the United States.

And millions of people are probably going, "huh, what?"

Four decades ago Friday, The Dallas Morning News committed an error so grave, so egregious, that it long remained shrouded in silence — out of a deep sense of shame and self-recrimination that one can only imagine.

The paper called Chewbacca a "Wookie."

At a NATO summit in Brussels, President Trump marked the unveiling of memorials of the Berlin Wall and the Sept. 11 attacks with a speech that, among other things, told gathered NATO leaders their levels of defense funding are "not fair" to U.S. taxpayers.

Trump also omitted any clear statement of support for Article 5, the NATO mutual-defense pledge — something other leaders had been hoping to hear.

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