Prosecutor 'Looking At Everything' In Next Steps On Pasco Police Shooting

The prosecutor in Pasco, Washington, said he’s now reviewing thousands of pages of an investigation into the February police shooting of farmworker Antonio Zambrano-Montes.
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Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

Teachers Rally In Red Against Legislature

It was a sea of red – red shirts and protest signs- at busy intersections and in Riverfront Park Wednesday. Teachers from Spokane and East Valley school districts spent their one-day walkout protesting against the legislature for not fulfilling school funding needs.
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The new movie San Andreas, starring Dwayne Johnson (better known as The Rock), is about a California earthquake so powerful that it destroys Los Angeles and San Francisco, and people can feel it all the way over on the East Coast.

Could this really happen? And can earthquakes ever be predicted, as one scientist (played by Paul Giamatti) succeeds in doing in this movie? We did some fact-checking with seismologist Lucile Jones of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Nora Jane Struthers may never have become a singer-songwriter if her identity hadn't been stolen. Rebuilding her life allowed her to take a risk and do something she'd wanted to for years. It paid off: She has a new album out titled Wake.

Her story begins at a charter school in Brooklyn where Struthers worked as an English teacher.

"I started teaching sophomores and moved to teaching seniors in my last year," Struthers says. "I loved it."

In this episode of NPR's series Inside Alzheimer's, we hear from Greg O'Brien about his struggle to deal with the hallucinations that are an increasing part of his illness. O'Brien, a longtime journalist in Cape Cod, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease in 2009.

It's a semi-annual alignment of sun and skyscrapers in downtown New York and it's happening tonight at 8:12 p.m. ET.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

It's a "year of fear" for children.

That's how Gordon Brown put it in a speech this month. He's the former British Prime Minister who is now the U.N. special envoy for global education. And he's worried about kids.

"This is not the year of the child but the year of fear," he said, "with 2015 already the worst year since 1945 for children being displaced, the worst year for children becoming refugees, the worst year for children seeing their schools attacked."

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert was due to be arraigned in federal court next week on charges he paid hush money — reportedly to keep silent allegations of sexual abuse that date from his days as a high school teacher and coach in rural Illinois.

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley announced today that he will seek the Democratic nomination for president, joining front-runner Hillary Clinton and dark horse candidate Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary race.

Speaking at a rally in Baltimore, where O'Malley served as mayor before becoming governor, he decried "an economy that has so concentrated wealth in the hands of the very few that it has taken opportunity out of the homes of the many."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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