Attorney: Troy Kelley Knew Of Federal Inquiry Nearly Two Years Ago

An attorney who once sued Troy Kelley says the Washington State Auditor has known about a federal probe into his past for nearly two years.
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SPR Health Forum: Unraveling the Mystery of MS

SPR will air a special two-hour forum on Multiple Sclerosis on both KPBX and KSFC stations. The full broadcast schedule is here: KPBX 91.1:* Thursday, March 26 from 6-8 p.m. KSFC 91.9:* Thursday, March 26 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.* Sunday, March 29 from noon-2 p.m. City Cable 5:* Saturday, March 28 from 9-11 p.m.* Sunday, March 29 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.* Sunday, April 12 from 7-9 p.m.* Wednesday, April 15 from 8-10 p.m.* Thursday, April 30 from 1-3 p.m.
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SPR and N3

Spokane Public Radio is part of the Northwest News Network, a public radio collaboration in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Discover more northwest news from SPR and N3.

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Zahra Karimi Nooristani, 18, cautiously works her way down a rock face high above Kabul as her coach, Farhad Jamshid, guides her.

It is hazardous for his top female student to be rappelling here, not only because of the steep drop, but because she is using a frayed, nine-year-old rope handed down from the men's mountaineering team.

Another danger she faces is the prospect of her neighbors finding out she's climbing at all.

Daniel Swann is exactly the type of person the National Security Agency (NSA) would love to have working for it. A fourth-year concurrent bachelors-masters student at Johns Hopkins University, the 22-year-old has a bright future in cybersecurity.

And growing up in Annapolis, Maryland, not far from the NSA's headquarters, Swann thought he might work at the agency, which intercepts phone calls, emails and other so-called "signals intelligence" from U.S. adversaries.

Even a careful psychiatric examination of the co-pilot involved in last week's Germanwings jetliner crash probably would not have revealed whether he intended to kill himself, researchers say.

"As a field, we're not very good at accurately predicting who is at risk for suicidal behavior," says Matthew Nock, a psychology professor at Harvard. He says studies show that mental health professionals "perform no better than chance," when it comes to predicting which patients will attempt suicide.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Passenger rail advocates came to the Oregon capitol Monday to ask lawmakers to preserve state support for Amtrak trains.

Two of the highest priority issues for Washington House Democrats are a $12 per hour minimum wage and paid sick leave.

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