Your ongoing support keeps SPR on air. Thanks!

Click photo above for Slide Show of Photos! SPR appreciates your financial support for the programming that airs non-stop on three different program streams, several stations across the Inland Northwest. National news, local reporting, and regional arts keeps you informed and inspired, and your gift goes a long way towards keeping that programming strong.
Read More

As Special Session Looms, 5 Things To Know About Washington Legislature

Sunday marks the 105th and final day of the Washington Legislature’s regular session. At this point a special session appears inevitable because House Democrats and Senate Republicans are nowhere near to agreeing on an operating budget for the next two years. Here are five things to know about the 2015 Washington legislature.Budget negotiations are stalled. Continuing resolutions and other budget Band-Aids are the norm in the “other” Washington. But not here. If there’s no budget on July 1,...
Read More

SPR and N3

Spokane Public Radio is part of the Northwest News Network, a public radio collaboration in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Discover more northwest news from SPR and N3.

KPBX

      

Six writers have withdrawn from the PEN American Center's annual gala on May 5 in protest against the free-speech organization's decision to give the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo its annual Freedom of Expression Courage Award.

Taking the same stance as the Kentucky Derby and other big events, the All England Lawn Tennis Club is telling ticket holders for this year's Wimbledon not to try to bring selfie-sticks to matches. The club reportedly cited the devices' "nuisance value."

Large music festivals Coachella and Lollapalooza banned the photo-taking props last month, with Coachella dismissing them as "narciss-sticks." Many museums and galleries have similar policies.

More than 1,000 days after James Holmes opened fire on an audience at a midnight movie in Aurora, Colo., his trial will begin in earnest Monday. His defense team admits Homes killed 12 people and injured 70 more; the trial is expected to turn on questions about Holmes' sanity – and whether he should be executed.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Nepal's devastating earthquake that hit Saturday is now blamed for at least 3,700 deaths. Reconstruction is estimated to cost billions. International aid efforts are underway, but aftershocks are rattling survivors' nerves and making the recovery even more challenging.

Rescue crews and aid groups are working to reach survivors — but their efforts are being hampered by the stricken areas' remote locations. Roads that are drivable are clogged with traffic.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

We've all heard that an aspirin a day can keep heart disease at bay. But lots of Americans seem to be taking it as a preventive measure, when many probably shouldn't.

In a recent national survey, more than half the adults who were middle age or older reported taking an aspirin regularly to prevent a heart attack or stroke. The Food and Drug Administration only recommends the drug for people who've already experienced such an event, or who are at extremely high risk.

On April 27, 1865, the steamboat Sultana exploded and sank while traveling up the Mississippi River, killing an estimated 1,800 people.

The event remains the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history (the Titanic killed 1,512 people). Yet few know the story of the Sultana's demise, or the ensuing rescue effort that included Confederate soldiers saving Union soldiers they might have shot just weeks earlier.

Copyright 2015 Maine Public Broadcasting Network. To see more, visit http://news.mpbn.net.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages