Attorney: Troy Kelley Knew Of Federal Inquiry Nearly Two Years Ago

An attorney who once sued Troy Kelley says the Washington State Auditor has known about a federal probe into his past for nearly two years.
Read More

SPR Health Forum: Unraveling the Mystery of MS

SPR will air a special two-hour forum on Multiple Sclerosis on both KPBX and KSFC stations. The full broadcast schedule is here: KPBX 91.1:* Thursday, March 26 from 6-8 p.m. KSFC 91.9:* Thursday, March 26 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.* Sunday, March 29 from noon-2 p.m. City Cable 5:* Saturday, March 28 from 9-11 p.m.* Sunday, March 29 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.* Sunday, April 12 from 7-9 p.m.* Wednesday, April 15 from 8-10 p.m.* Thursday, April 30 from 1-3 p.m.
Read More

SPR and N3

Spokane Public Radio is part of the Northwest News Network, a public radio collaboration in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Discover more northwest news from SPR and N3.

Now Playing

Car Talk Vehicle Donation Service

Meet The Bacteria That Make A Stink In Your Pits

6 minutes ago

The human armpit has a lot to offer bacteria. It's moist, it's warm, and it's usually dark.

But when the bacteria show up, they can make a stink. That's because when some kinds of bacteria encounter sweat they produce smelly compounds, transforming the armpit from a neutral oasis to the mothership of body odor. And one group of bacteria is to blame for the stink, researchers say.

The Obama administration is pledging that the U.S. will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 26-28 percent of 2005 levels over the next 10 years. The new target was submitted to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Tuesday.

NPR's Michel Martin led two challenging conversations about race this week, focusing on fearful perceptions of African-American men and how these fears play out in people's everyday lives. Guests including author and Georgetown University Law Professor Paul Butler examined the research and the complicated emotions behind this fear.

"When you're in an elevator or walking behind somebody and you feel like you have to perform to make them feel safe, it's like apologizing for your existence," says Butler.

Just about a full decade since the girl with a dragon tattoo was introduced to readers, she'll be making her grand return to fiction — albeit with another author's name on the cover. Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy of crime novels is set to become something more on Sept. 1, when the series' new addition hits store shelves as The Girl in the Spider Web. Publisher Alfred A. Knopf released the book's title and cover art Tuesday.

The most pressing health threat in the Latin American country of Honduras has nothing to do with germs or superbugs.

It's from the barrel of a gun.

Every day, patients with gunshot wounds seek treatment, overwhelming the country's few hospitals. Violence is the third-leading cause of death in the country of 8.2 million people. For four years running now, The U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime has ranked San Pedro Sula, the second-largest city in Honduras, as the world's most violent city.

So how do you stop it?

The six nations that have been debating a plan to curb Iran's nuclear program and ease economic sanctions will hit the deadline for a framework agreement at 6 p.m. ET. Ahead of that deadline, there are signs that a deal is in the works — and that it might not be a sweeping arrangement that lays out future terms.

Early Tuesday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said he believed an agreement would be reached by the end of the day.

A new Indiana law that has set off a firestorm of criticism and threats of boycotts should be repealed or revised, says Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard. Titled the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the law has drawn protests from critics who say it allows businesses to refuse service to gays and lesbians.

Ballard tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that those who support the law are "missing the bigger trend."

He added, "Everything changes over history. We have to get to a certain point where we have that balance."

Katie Morrow became a teacher, among other things, because of wanderlust.

"I'm going to be a teacher because I can go anywhere in the world," she thought.

She's originally from a small town in Nebraska called O'Neill, population 3,700. "In the middle of nowhere, literally," she says.

So where did she end up teaching? Right back in O'Neill. She fell in love with a hometown boy and ended up at O'Neill's only public school. It's K-12, with 750 students.

Morrow teaches middle-school English; she's also a technology integration specialist.

Colorado Allows Sales Of Powdered Alcohol

3 hours ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages