Road-Tripping On The West Coast Electric Highway

The call of the open road beckons to electric car owners now that Washington and Oregon have completed their portions of the West Coast Electric Highway, a network of rapid recharging stations to enable long distance electric-powered travel.
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Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

DNA Match Blows Open Spokane’s Ruby Doss Cold Case

People living in Spokane in 1986 may remember this name: Ruby Doss. She was strangled to death and found by a transient, and police never found her killer. Thursday, Spokane Police said they have a suspect: Richard J Aguirre.
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SPR and N3

Spokane Public Radio is part of the Northwest News Network, a public radio collaboration in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Discover more northwest news from SPR and N3.

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Boxer Manny Pacquiao is being sued for his failure to disclose a shoulder injury during his "Fight of the Century" Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Lawmakers in Olympia are in a special session to finalize the Washington state budget. Some teachers’ unions have decided to walk out for a day to appeal for more money in the K-12 budget.

Federal agents who forgot that a detained San Diego college student was in a jail cell and left him without food or water for more than four days were reprimanded and suspended for up to seven days, a punishment the Justice Department says is inadequate.

The case involves Daniel Chong's detention in 2012 by agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

1 hour ago

Butter (arguably) makes everything better – even tea. For Chime Dhorje, who works at Café Himalaya in New York City, the butter in the cup of tea before him ideally comes from a yak.

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Dhorje's homeland, Tibet. Tibetans drink it all day long — up to 60 cups a day, it's said — though they're not the only ones who enjoy it: It's consumed in countries throughout the Himalayas.

The Hillary Clinton campaign went into overdrive Tuesday trying to minimize the damage from a new book that delves into Clinton Foundation fundraising — and it's not using the typical channels to do so.

Back in 1890, Thomas Edison gave us the world's first talking dolls. Today, the glassy-eyed cherubs that are still around stand about 2 feet tall; they have wooden limbs and a metal body; and they sound supercreepy. (If you're looking for a soundtrack to your nightmares, listen to the audio story above.) Edison built and sold about 500 of them back in 1890. Now, new technology has made hearing them possible for the first time in decades.

A drive across the Northwest quickly reveals things look really dry everywhere.

The island of Puerto Rico is many things: a tropical paradise, a U.S. territory and an economic mess. After years of deficits, state-owned institutions in Puerto Rico owe investors some $73 billion. That's four times the debt that forced Detroit into bankruptcy two years ago. The bill is now due.

The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men.

Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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