Deborah Wang

Deborah is an award–winning radio and television journalist whose career spans three decades. A long–time network foreign correspondent, Deborah has reported from more than two dozen countries, including China, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kuwait, and Iraq.

Deborah's first reporting job was at public radio station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1990, she went to work for National Public Radio, and served as NPR's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. During that time, she covered the the Persian Gulf War from coalition headquarters in Saudi Arabia, and then spent many months in Kuwait, Turkey and Northern Iraq filing stories on the war's aftermath. In 1993, she joined ABC News as a television correspondent in Beijing and Hong Kong, and covered, among other things, Hong Kong's handover from British to Chinese rule. In 1999, she set up the network's first news bureau in Seattle.

Deborah has also worked as an on–air anchor for CNN International, and for the nationally syndicated public radio show Here and Now.

Deborah has won numerous awards for her reporting, including the Alfred I. DuPont Silver Baton for coverage of the first Gulf War, and the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for best radio documentary on Cambodia.

The landslide on Rattlesnake Ridge near Yakima, Washington, is likely going to be a slow one—it could take years or decades to fully come down. That’s the upshot of a new independent geology report commissioned by the state.

Emergency managers along Washington’s southwest coast said they have fixed a significant glitch in their emergency alert systems. That’s after some residents there did not receive news of a tsunami watch after a recent earthquake.

Visitors To Mount Rainier Find National Park Mostly Closed

Jan 21, 2018

When Elizabeth and David Krout of Seattle woke up Saturday morning at Mount Rainier National Park, they were excited to have a weekend of snowshoeing ahead of them.

They had arrived at the park on Friday afternoon, and since they had no cellphone service there, they didn’t receive any messages—including news that the U.S. government partially shut down late that evening.

The opioid crisis is front and center at the Washington Legislature this week. On Monday, lawmakers heard testimony on three bills aimed at preventing and treating opioid addiction and reducing overdose deaths.

The Associated Press is reporting today that of the 100 largest public universities in the country, more than half don’t keep track of student suicides. That includes the University of Oregon, which the AP says either does not keep or does not consistently collect the data.  

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