Weekend Edition Sunday

KPBX: Sundays 6am-10am | KSFC: Sundays 5am-7am, 10am-11am
  • Hosted by Rachel Martin

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic.  Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein.

With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts--word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster--a.k.a. Will Shortz--puzzle editor of The New York Times.  A caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather…vigorous.

About the host:

In January 2012, Rachel Martin began hosting the program. Previously she served as NPR National Security Correspondent and was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project. She has also been the NPR religion correspondent and foreign correspondent based in Berlin.

Ways to Connect

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Retirees across the country had no idea what happened to their second homes in Florida. Some have gone to Florida to find out for themselves, as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports from Fort Myers.

(SOUNDBITE OF RAKING LEAVES)

Brooklyn Is Magical In 'Shadowhouse Fall'

Sep 17, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

How Miami's Little Haiti Fared

Sep 17, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Journalist Franklin Foer worries that we're all losing our minds as big tech companies infiltrate every aspect of our lives.

In his new book, World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech, Foer compares the way we feel about technology now to the way people felt about pre-made foods, like TV dinners, when they were first invented.

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