Eclipse

Cell phone towers in Oregon’s path of totality are expected to overload. That’s because of selfies-with-the-sun that thousands of visitors might try to upload.

But there’s an unexpected consequence of cell coverage going down: farm irrigation circles could go dry.

The day of the long-awaited coast-to-coast solar eclipse has arrived — and if history is any guide, it's likely that somebody's eyes are going to get hurt.

Miss out on eclipse glasses? If so, there’s still plenty of time for a homemade science project. 


All you need to make a pinhole projector is a cereal box, a pin, a pair of scissors, some aluminum foil, and a roll of tape.



Inland Journal, August 17, 2017

Aug 17, 2017

Inland Journal for August 17, 2017

This week on Inland Journal:
    ▪    Spokane County decides to pull its November ballot measure that would have asked voters for an increase in property taxes beyond what the state allows without a public vote.
    ▪    Spokane’s Central Valley School District has several new or renovated schools that will open this fall to students. We’ll visit one of them and talk about what kind of effect they will have on the district.
    ▪    The massive cleanup of mining waste continues in north Idaho. We’ll talk about the challenge of cleaning up waste that has been moved out of the Silver Valley toward the Spokane-Coeur d’Alene area.
    ▪    A large number of volunteers who will be giving their time to help with science experiments related to next Monday’s solar eclipse.
    ▪    Steve Jackson will have a report about the replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial that will come to the Spokane area next week in conjunction with the new PBS series about the Vietnam War.

On Monday, the moon will completely eclipse the sun, and people all over the U.S. will watch.

For those who have been boning up on eclipse trivia for weeks, congratulations. For everyone else, here are the things you need to know about the phenomenon.

Oregon's capital city and the surrounding countryside are expected to be among the top destinations for eclipse watchers in Oregon. The expected influx of visitors has led local officials to beef up their emergency services for the event.

To see this month's total solar eclipse, the first one to be visible from the contiguous United States in nearly 40 years, all Donald Liebenberg will have to do is open his front door and step outside.

"It's a really special treat to be able to have one in my driveway," says Liebenberg, who has trekked to Turkey, Zambia, China and Pukapuka, a remote island in the Pacific, to see past eclipses.

This month's total solar eclipse might be the most-studied disappearance of the sun ever, thanks in part to legions of citizen scientists from the Northwest and beyond.





A state of emergency, excessive heat and an extended period of dry weather are unlikely to pair well with an influx of up to 1.5 million visitors in Oregon in two weeks.

You might think that, after thousands of years of observing total solar eclipses, science-minded folks would have exhausted what can be learned from this awesome natural spectacle.

You would be wrong.

Pages