Wildfire

News and updates about wildfires, fire funding, and other fire related stories.
For the most recent information:
NWCC Blog (Northwest Interagency Coordination Center)
Map of Fires and Northwest Smoke Air Quality
Wildfire Incident Reports:
Washington | Idaho | Oregon | Montana

Spokane Public Radio

The battle for a Washington state House seat in the 7th Legislative District pits a newcomer Democratic candidate against the Republican incumbent, who has only held the seat for a few months.

It's an unusually bad wild fire season in the West, and for weeks people across the region have been breathing air thick with smoke.

"There's smoke from Canada, smoke from Idaho, smoke from California and Montana. There's smoke everywhere," says Greg Svelund, a spokesman for Oregon's Department of Environmental Quality.

Will Folsom via Flickr, Creative Commons License

Rural fire crews in northeast Washington are on alert, hoping no major fires break out before the rains finally arrive.

The ponderosa forests of Stevens County are tinder dry right now, and fire managers hope they have enough resources to be able to handle what might be in store before fire season is over.

Labrador Calls on Congress to Pass Wildfire Bill

Sep 6, 2017
USA Today

Idaho Republican U.S. Representative Raul Labrador is pushing his colleagues to pass a bill aimed at reducing the risk of wildfires.

On Wednesday afternoon, Labrador issued a statement calling for the House to vote on a bill known as the Resilient Federal Forests Act, a bill on which he’s a co-sponsor. The Republican-led House approved it last year, but the Senate never considered it.

Wildfires burning in the Western U.S. are threatening some of America's most treasured national parks – and in some areas, the damage has already been done.

Last week in Montana, a 20-square-mile blaze burned the historic Sperry Chalet, a hotel and dining room built in 1914 and only reachable by trail.

Schools Cancel Outdoor Activities

The air quality in our region is the worst it has been since the big fires in the summer of 2015. Officials are warning folks to try to limit their exposure to the outside air if possible.

Bob Lutz is the Spokane County Health officer who says the particulate levels are now bad enough they pose a risk to everyone, not just those with breathing disorders like asthma.

The wildfire smoke in Washington state has been extreme for days now, and many are wondering just when the air might clear out. An atmospheric scientist from the Washington Department of Ecology thinks the severe wildfire smoke may start to clear out a bit by Thursday for the western part of the state, but linger longer in the east. According to Ranil Dahmmapala,  “The good news is from the weekend onward, there’s a good chance for a pattern shift, and we might have southwest winds to blow some of the smoke away and keep the British Columbia smoke away for a while.”





A state of emergency, excessive heat and an extended period of dry weather are unlikely to pair well with an influx of up to 1.5 million visitors in Oregon in two weeks.

A summer filled with wildfires means air conditions in the Northwest are going from bad to worse. Fires from British Columbia and around Washington state have contributed to a smoky week.

Like a dreamy scene, the Yakima Valley is blanketed in thick haze. But the reality is not so serene. Coupled with high temperatures and humidity, the smog is taking its toll on local residents.

USA Today

With all this water in our region right now -- one of the wettest springs ever -- the chance of a wildfire starting and gaining traction somewhere is pretty remote. But the memories of the severe wildfire seasons of 2014 and 2015 — speaking of the power of Mother Nature — are still fresh in the minds of Washington elected leaders.

Last week, Governor Jay Inslee, Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz and a few others met with landowners like Bonnie Cobb a bit west of Spokane. They wanted to see the work these folks had done to keep their homes and property safe from wildfire.

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