Emily Schwing

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio’s programs like “Morning Edition” and “All things Considered.” She has also filed for Public Radio International’s “The World,” American Public Media’s “Marketplace,” and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours’ worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

The suspect in a shooting that left one student dead and three injured at Freeman High School outside of Spokane, Washington, last week quietly pleaded not guilty on Friday.

But the plea was mostly procedural. 




The Freeman High School football team will play a home game Friday night on their campus south of Spokane Valley. School will resume Monday after this week’s fatal shooting.

The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office said the suspect in a shooting at Freeman High School outside Spokane, Washington, that left one student dead and three others injured Wednesday was “obsessed” with school shootings. 



Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich wore two loops of powder blue and white ribbon—the school’s colors—pinned to this chest as he briefed reporters in front of the courthouse. He said the 15-year-old suspected gunman got “sucked into a counter culture of violence.” 



After she set her books down in a biology classroom Wednesday morning Kelby Cochrane got hungry. So she asked a friend to go with her to her locker at Freeman High School in Freeman, Washington to grab a snack. On her way back she heard what she later learned were gunshots allegedly fired by schoolmate Caleb Sharpe.

“It sounded like a paper bag popping or a balloon like when they screw off in lunch or something," Cochrane said. "Then I heard two more and I pulled her into the classroom.”

A student is dead and three are in serious but stable condition after a shooting Wednesday morning at Freeman High School in Freeman, Washington, near Spokane.

A student told reporters that a male schoolmate had brought two guns to school and fired one of them at the beginning of the late-start school day at 10:15 a.m. Spokane fire chief Brian Schaeffer said the suspect was "taken down safely" and is in custody of law enforcement. 

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