Steve Jackson

News Assignment Editor; Morning Edition Host

Steve was part of the Spokane Public Radio family for many years before he came on air in 1999.  His wife, Laurie, produced Radio Ethiopia in the late 1980s through the '90s, and Steve used to “lurk in the shadowy world” of Weekend SPR.  “It was a different world on the weekends at night here.  There was a lot of interplay between shows and producers, and live jam sessions on the air.”  Now, Steve is the voice of local weather and news during Morning Edition, writing, editing, producing and/or delivering newscasts and features for both KPBX and KSFC.  He also makes the morning coffee.  Aside from SPR, Steve is a simple, dirt farmer who enjoys gardening, chickens, music, astronomy, photography, sports cars and camping.  He plays acoustic and electric guitar and is proud to say that his mom listens to him every day.

Ways to Connect

Spokane democratic state representative Marcus Ricelli is hopeful that funding for some statewide improvements to dental health will make though the latest special legislative session.

While the funding of public education and dealing with the Supreme Court’s McCleary decision tops the agenda for this newest special session, there are efforts to increase funding for oral health at several clinics across the state that offer services for low income and Medicaid patients.

At least one private homeowner has filed a suit against the Air Force after chemicals believed to have come from firefighting foam showed up their well in Airway Heights.

Airway Heights officials say they hope to have the chemicals flushed out of the water system, but it may take as long as ten more days. That, after the city manager said earlier this week he expected the job to take 28 hours. In the meantime, the water supply will not take in water from 4 wells shown to have concentrations of the chemicals.

Airway Heights residents are being cautioned not to drink from the city’s water supply, due to chemical contamination.

City residents who live west of Hayford Road are being asked to refrain from consuming any city water, after two chemicals that may have originated at Fairchild Air Force Base were found in four city wells at a level above 70 parts per trillion.

A call by US attorney General Jeff Sessions to impose the harshest penalties on criminal defendants is not finding much support from the General Counsel for Washington State’s governor.

On Friday US Attorney General Jeff Sessions told federal prosecutors to seek the toughest penalties in criminal cases, and overrode  a 2013 directive from Attorney General Eric Holder that instructed federal prosecutors not to specify the amount of drugs involved when charging low-level and nonviolent drug offenders. That policy effectively gave judges discretion to set sentences lower than the mandatory punishments ranging from five years to life in prison.

The legal counsel for Governor Jay Inslee, Nick Brown, feels that is a bad move.

Photo courtesy of Tohru Murakami via Flickr

A new study by WSU researchers has found that toxic effects of exposure to mercury in fish can be passed on to later generations.

The WSU School of Biological Sciences study looked at zebrafish that were exposed to very low levels of methylmercury, which occurs in nature when mercury is metabolized by small organisms.

It found that the toxic effects of exposure were passed on not only to their offspring, but also the third generation of zebrafish.

The toxic effects were neurological and included abnormal locomotion, impaired vision, and hyperactivity.

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